Deputy Minister Rhoda Jama Elmi: Leading the Charge for Somaliland’s International Recognition

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The Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of Somaliland, Rhoda Jama Elmi, has called on the international community to recognize the Republic of Somaliland as a fully recognized state.

In a statement posted on her social media account, she argued that Somaliland has been sovereign for 33 uninterrupted years since reclaiming its independence in 1991, longer than it existed in the union with Somalia.

The Deputy Minister also highlighted the discrimination and repression that occurred during the union with Somalia, leading to a war of genocide inflicted by the Somalia government on the people of Somaliland.

This, coupled with the fact that “75% of Somaliland’s population is under the age of 40, makes it evident that the majority of the nation has only known Somaliland’s green, white, and red flag as a symbol of their sovereignty and an integral part of their identity,” she said.

The international community’s recognition of Somaliland as an independent state is both logical and morally imperative.

“It is both logical and morally imperative for the international community to respect Somaliland’s aspirations to reclaim its rightful place among the comity of nations as a fully recognized state, once again,” she added.

75% of Somaliland’s population is under the age of 40 and has only known the green, white, and red flag, which is not just a symbol of their sovereignty but an integral part of their identity, shaping their lives and aspirations

Somaliland has demonstrated its ability to govern itself and has worked tirelessly to build a stable and democratic society. The country has held multiple peaceful elections, established a functioning government, and maintained a robust economy.

Despite these achievements, the international community has yet to recognize Somaliland as an independent state. While the country has received support from some African nations and organizations, including the African Union, it has yet to be recognized by any major world power.

The lack of recognition has had severe consequences for Somaliland, including restrictions on trade, investment, and access to international aid. Additionally, it has prevented the country from participating in international organizations and engaging in diplomatic relations with other nations fully.

Somaliland has existed as an independent state longer than it did in the union with Somalia

For Somaliland to reach its full potential, it is essential that the international community recognize its sovereignty. The country has worked hard to establish a stable and democratic society and has demonstrated its ability to govern itself effectively. Recognition would not only be a symbolic gesture but would also provide much-needed support to the country’s development efforts.

Below is the full statement she posted today in her X account:

“If we set aside Somaliland’s status as a separate entity from Somalia before its independence from Great Britain on June 26th, 1960, there’s another compelling argument to consider—the uninterrupted 33 years of sovereignty since Somaliland reclaimed its independence in 1991.

During this time, Somaliland has existed as an independent state longer than it did in the union with Somalia, which will be remembered for its division, discrimination, and repression, culminating in a war of genocide inflicted by the Somali government on the people of Somaliland.

Ambassador Rhoda Jama Elmi, Somaliland’s Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs

Furthermore, when we factor in that approximately 75% of Somaliland’s population is under the age of 40, it becomes evident that the majority of our young nation has only known the green, white, and red of Somaliland.

This flag is not just a symbol of their sovereignty but an integral part of their identity, shaping their lives and aspirations.

In light of these realities, it is both logical and morally imperative for the international community to respect Somaliland’s aspirations to reclaim its rightful place among the comity of nations as a fully recognized state, once again.”